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       endobj 15 0 obj stream 612 0 0 790 0 0 cm /Img1 Do endstream endobj 16 0 obj stream. Please turn JavaScript on and reload the page. endbfrange endcmap CMapName currentdict /CMap defineresource pop end end. ] endbfrange endcmap CMapName currentdict /CMap defineresource pop end end. stream /CIDInit /ProcSet findresource begin 12 dict begin begincmap /CIDSystemInfo. stream /CIDInit /ProcSet findresource begin 12 dict begin begincmap /CIDSystemInfo. The security system for this website has been triggered. Completing the challenge below proves you are a human and gives you temporary access. Please stand by, while we are checking your browser. Meteorology, botany, and zoology are all professions in which one would likely find individuals who demonstrate high levels of naturalistic intelligence. In a world where this particular skill is less important for sur- vival than it was in earlier times, naturalis- tic capacities are brought to bear in making consequential distinctions with respect to man-made objects displayed in a consumer society. These descriptions of the eight intelli- gences that comprise MI theory relied upon the domains or disciplines. Gardner accentuates two primary claims: ( 1 ) All individuals possess the full range of. An ability to identify and distinguish among different types of plants, animals, and weather formations that are found in the natural world. Bodily- Kinesthetic An ability to use one's own body to create products or solve problems. Interpersonal. Drawing on these criteria, Gardner ini- tially identified seven intelligences. How- ever, in the mid- 1990 s, he concluded that an. example, an individual may possess a profile of intelligences that is high in spatial intelli- gence but moderate or low in interpersonal intelligence or vice versa. This conception of intelligence as multiple rather than sin- gular forms the primary distinction between MI theory and the conception of intelligence that dominates Western psychological the- ory and much of common discourse. A second key distinction concerns the ori- gins of intelligence. While some contem- porary scholars have asserted that intelli- gence is influenced by environmental factors (Diamond & Hopson, 1998; Lucas, Morley, intellectual faculties. Sternberg ( 1985, 1990 ) offered a triarchic theory of intelligence that identified analytic, creative, and practical intelligences. Finally, Ceci ( 1990, 1996 )h a s. All content in this area was uploaded by Katie Davis on Jun 07, 2017. claims of this far-reaching theory as well as some of the adjustments to the theory made over the past 25. schools across the globe have incorporated MI principles into their mission, curriculum, and pedagogy; and hundreds of books have been written (in numerous languages) on the relevance of MI theory to educators and edu- cational institutions (Chen, Moran, & Gard- ner, 2009 ). In 2005,a 10 -acre "science experi-. ceived of intelligence as the sum of three parts: abstract intelligence, mechan- ical intelligence, and social intelligence. Thurstone ( 1938, Thurstone & Thurstone, Sorry, preview is currently unavailable. You can download the paper by clicking the button above. to assess directly whether an individual pos- sesses a profile of intelligences high in spa- tial intelligence; however, one might reason- ably infer that an individual who demon- strates excellent performance in the domain of architecture or sculpture or geometry possesses high spatial intelligence. Likewise, excellence in the domains of ballet or ortho- pedic surgery suggests the possession of high bodily-kinesthetic intelligence. It is possible that in the future more direct methods of measuring intelligences may be devised– for example, through evidence about neural structures or even through genetic markers. cally finds individuals who demonstrate high levels of each intelligence. This is because we do not yet have psychometric or neu- roimaging techniques that directly assess an individual's capacity for a particular intelli- gence. For example, no test has been devised Table 24. 1. be understood as consisting of seven pri- mary abilities. Guilford ( 1967; Guilford &. this chapter). In future years, new proposed intelligences might be found to meet the criteria for identification as a unique intel- ligence (Battro & Denham, 2007; Chen &. eighth intelligence, naturalistic intelligence, met the criteria for identification as an intel- ligence as well (see Table 24. 2 ). Naturalis-. An ability to analyze information and create products involving oral and written language such as speeches, books, and memos. Logical- Mathematical An ability to develop equations and proofs, make calculations, and solve abstract problems. Spatial. It should be pointed out that Gard- ner's conceptualization of multiple intelli- gence does not belong exclusively to Gard- ner; other scholars and practitioners have made numerous applications of the prin- cipal tenets, sometimes with little regard for Gardner's own claims. In this chapter, intelligences through experimental psychological tasks. r It should demonstrate a core, intelligences– the intelligences are what define human beings, cognitively speaking; ( 2 ) no two individuals, not even identical. An ability to recognize and manipulate large-scale and fine-grained spatial images. Musical. intelligence as pluralistic grew out of his observation that individuals who demon- strated substantial talent in domains as diverse as chess, music, athletics, politics, and entrepreneurship possessed capacities in these domains that should be accounted for in conceptualizing intelligence. Accord- ingly, in developing MI theory and its broader characterization of intelligence, Gardner did not focus on the creation and interpretation of psychometric instruments. Rather, he drew upon research findings from evolutionary biology, neuroscience, anthro- pology, psychometrics, and psychological studies of prodigies and savants. Through synthesis of relevant research across these fields, Gardner established several criteria for identification of a unique intelligence (see Table 24. 1 ). 486 KATIE DAVIS, JOANNA CHRISTODOULOU, SCOTT SEIDER, AND HOWARD GARDNER. general intelligence conceive of intelligence as an innate trait with which one is born and which one can therefore do little to change (Eysenck, 1994; Herrnstein & Murray,. CHAPTER 24 The Theory of Multiple Intelligences Katie Davis, Joanna Christodoulou, Scott Seider, and Howard Gardner Part 1: Background. which participants can explore their own profile of intelligences (Danfoss Universe, 2007 ). In what follows, we outline the major. An ability to recognize and understand other people's moods, desires, motivations, and intentions. Intrapersonal. systems, of the sort used in formal or informal education. r It should be supported by evidence from. In book: Cambridge Handbook of Intelligence (pp.485-503) Chapter: 24 Publisher: Cambridge University Press Editors: R.J. Sternberg, S.B. Kaufman. This person is not on ResearchGate, or hasn't claimed this research yet. representation– that is, its neural structure and functioning should be distinguishable from that of other major human faculties. r It should have a distinct developmental. An ability to recognize and understand one's own moods, desires, motivations, and intentions. In the 25 -year history of the theory,.
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